Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Nursing Homes: High Turnover Of Workers Hurts Quality Of Care

The New York Times has an article on nursing homes. It highlights a fact most people are unaware of but those of us in the industry know: the turnover rate for employees such as nurses' aides are extraordinarily high in the US. Often a staggering 70% or more of these employees quit or move on every year. Naturally, this damages the quality of care for the residents.

The solution? Treat these employees with respect, give them better training and more responsibility. That's all wonderful and vital, but a far more crucial incentive is mentioned only in passing: health and pension benefits. And one solution not mentioned at all: increasing the wages of these skilled workers which average $10.48 an hour (roughly 7 pounds).

Continental Travelnurse knows what the valuable skills of nurses are worth. That's why we place our nurses only in the best hospitals and medical facilities. That's why our nurses wear staff uniforms -- they're part of the team, not a day worker who will come and go but someone who will be part of the staff for three months. And -- shhhhhhh! -- we make certain our workers get a better salary than the equivalent people on staff.

Tired of being taken for granted? Come to the UK where your skills are desperately needed and highly valuable, where you'll be treated with he respect your talent deserves and where Continental Travelnurse will help you explore the UK and Europe in a way no tourist on holiday for two weeks could ever hope to do.

Check out our website for more information.

Friday, July 9, 2010

New RNs Feel Job Market Squeeze In US

USA Today highlights a story that impacts nurses everywhere, but especially in the US: "NEW RN GRADS FEEL SQUEEZE FOR JOBS."

As everyone in the medical community knows, there is a long-term chronic shortage of nurses that will grow and grow in the next two decades.

But for various reasons in the US, new RN grads are finding it hard to get their first choice of jobs at the moment. USA Today spells out some reasons:

1. The recession has convinced experienced nurses to keep their jobs rather than retire.
2. Other experienced RNs have come out of retirement, switched from part-time to full-time, etc.
3. Hospitals need RNs but tight budgets force them to make do.
4. Demand will be high down the road but new RNs are at a temporary surplus in some markets.

Long-term, RNs will be in extreme demand in the US. One analysis -- done before the new health care bill expanded medical insurance to tens of millions of Americans -- estimated the US will be short 260,000 by 2025.

USA Today has some good tips for new RNs: be flexible, look farther afield since nurses might be scarce in other parts of the country, consider home health care and the such.

But they miss the best advice of all: get in touch with the experienced staff of Continental Travelnurse. (And if you have a friend who is an RN and faces this predicament, call them and urge them to call us right away.)

The skills of RNs are highly valued and highly in demand in the UK. We can get you the work setting you desire, the respect you deserve and the salary you need -- and you can explore the UK and Europe while doing it.

Why commit to living in a part of the US or Canada or Australia or New Zealand that doesn't appeal to you or a setting that isn't your first choice? Why indeed when Continental Travelnurse has so many options to offer. Instead of settling, go on an adventure. Come to the UK, put your skills to use immediately and fall in love with the UK and the rest of Europe, all of it cheap and easy flights away for fun weekends or during vacation breaks. You can commit to as little as three month stints at a time or stay as long as you like until your first choice is available at home, all while gaining valuable experience and memories of Europe that will last a lifetime.

Call Continental Travelnurse today. Why settle for less when you have acquired the skills that deserve the best?


Have you seen an article online you think other nurses might be interested in? Send a link to your Continental Travelnurse contact or directly to mgiltz@pipeline.com and we might post it here.